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Rescued red fox likes to be greeted in the morning (VIDEO)

Zoesnow_thumb By MissT | September 29, 2013 | Comments (37)

Chuckles the red fox gets excited when she sees people first thing in the morning and wags her tail much like a dog. She unfortunately could not be released back into the wild because she suffers from neurological problems. She is a permanent resident at Treehouse Wildlife Center in Brighton, IL.

 

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Comments on this Article

I hate to read comments by people who just want to be negative and act as if they know every damn thing. How annoying. People feel they have to critique everything. If you two (Kathy and Michelle) feel you can do a better job taking care of wildlife, why don't you just locate the wildlife center which Is dedicated to doing just that and do it better? Ok? Give it a rest. Downers. Beautiful video, and I commend the people taking care of this animal.
I hate to read comments by people who just want to be negative and act as if they know every damn thing. How annoying. People feel they have to critique everything. If you two (Kathy and Michelle) feel you can do a better job taking care of wildlife, why don't you just locate the wildlife center which Is dedicated to doing just that and do it better? Ok? Give it a rest. Downers. Beautiful video, and I commend the people taking care of this animal.
I hate to read comments by people who just want to be negative and act as if they know every damn thing. How annoying. People feel they have to critique everything. If you two (Kathy and Michelle) feel you can do a better job taking care of wildlife, why don't you just locate the wildlife center which Is dedicated to doing just that and do it better? Ok? Give it a rest. Downers. Beautiful video, and I commend the people taking care of this animal.
Chuckles is lovely! I am so happy she was rescued and is able to live out her life in comfort and safety. Here is another rescued fox who was plucked from death and cannot be returned to the wild. This girl is in England: http://youtu.be/iw3bK_zFGoc
Chuckles is beautiful. Thank you for caring for all the animals.
DO YOUR RESEARCH Their page about her: http:/ /treehousewildlifecenter .com/whoisheremammals .html (remove spaces) She was attached as a kit by a dog -- damaged mentally permanently. So tired of all the "know-it-alls" who spout off, passing UNINFORMED, UNTRAINED, and UNINTELLIGENT judgement.
I have just viewed the link Katie put up here and they've done just what I thought they should do, put her in an enclosure with other foxes. Looks like she's doing just fine. Please watch the video of her in her new home. Thank you Katie. I agree with Aaron Siering, do your own research and know the facts before attacking others on this site. I do commend these people at the shelter for helping the helpless.
READ!!! The POST! And look at the other video's on YouTube about this fox. The fox has neurological problems and it is normal for THIS fox!
That fox is terrified - esp of someone pointing a camera at her. "Wagging tails" is not a sign, in dog language, of glee, but of anxiety. The sounds alone should give you a clue - pathetic, whimpering cries. And being submissive to the extreme. That was a painful video to watch. I hope Treehouse stops humanizing the fox and gives it some serious space to grow accustomed to being in captivity.
Here is another video of Chuckles and other foxes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LOQ0BGLJK4
Cute little fella!
Aaron Siering, you expressed EXACTLY what was on my mind when I was reading these comments by saying: "The claim, implied or explicit, that "I know so much about animal behavior that I can make universal judgements about all manner of species" expresses the type of ignorance and risk captured in the phrase, a little knowledge is dangerous thing." I think we forgot that each and every animal is individually different even though all of them do generally follow behavioral patterns according to their species. Just because an animal generally behaves a certain way when it feels threatened or scared does not mean that every animal within that species will, especially if this animal has a neurological condition. These people spend every single day working alongside these animals and they know and observe their behavior every day during different circumstances. You have not spent a single a day with this animal, so what gives you the right to say that the people who spend every single day observing a neurologically challenged animal know less about what this animal's responses to stimuli than you do?
Yes it did appear upon a superficial inspection that the Fox was stressed, as it turns out however that really isn't such extreme behaviour for foxes. So there are too many unknowns here for anybody to make any type of credible judgement whatsoever, unless that person is an actual expert in the behavior of Foxes: the exact nature of the Fox's health problems, how the fox felt about the camera, the caretakers experience and relationship with that particular animal, and how foxes express excitement -- which as it turns out is by rolling over on their backs, waging their tails furiously and making high pitched whining noises, while making facial grimaces. Something that in dogs and wolves would be an indication of stress. The claim, implied or explicit, that "I know so much about animal behavior that I can make universal judgements about all manner of species" expresses the type of ignorance and risk captured in the phrase, a little knowledge is dangerous thing. And for what it is worth my personal opinion is that Katy you did come off as unreasonably certain, critical and negative. You also seem to refuse to take responsibility for how you chose to express yourself which did seem to paint you in a unfavorable light. Attacking Mo -- whom I don't know, and am not here to defend -- just seemed to confirm that impression. It's one thing to express concern and one's personal opinion, but own up to the fact that it is simply your opinion, i.e. don't pretend it is a certain and incontestable fact of reality, and provide support for your reasoning. Also doing your own research before committing those opinions to a message board would be, in my opinion, polite.
There are many organizations run by people that love animals but do not have enough professionals on staff but are run and staffed by volunteers. These well meaning individuals do not always know what they truly need to know to handle such wild animals even though they wish the creature no harm and it is their hearts desire to be kind.
lately i have seen two videos of foxes and never knew they were so playful. having only really know them to be sneaky as per Aesop's fables... they are quite charming animals.
Tail wagging and rolling over may not be such terrible signs in foxes... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iw3bK_zFGoc
They are professionals and have been working with wild animals for a long time. They probably don't need people that THINK they know what they are talking about but really don't offering them information that they probably already know. I actually took the time to email them to find out the real story. Sad that you couldn't of done that first before you started assuming.
and like I said.. no one here is putting them down. Offering information is not the same as offering criticism. You can't seem to tell the difference.
and like I said.. no one here is putting them down. Offering information is not the same as offering criticism. You can't seem to tell the difference.
That's easy, some of us here can properly interpret body language. You can't. That's all.
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