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Dhicon_thumb By DogHeirs Team | Jul 2012

<p>Baltimore City Police Officer Dan Waskiewicz responded to a call about a vicious dog chasing kids and left the scene with his new best friend. "Bo" now lives with Officer Waskiewicz and two other canine siblings.</p>
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From http://modifiedk9.blogspot.ca/2012/05/police-re...

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Baltimore City Police Officer Dan Waskiewicz responded to a call about a vicious dog chasing kids and left the scene with his new best friend. "Bo" now lives with Officer Waskiewicz and two other canine siblings.

 

 

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Officer Dan, I am embarrassed to admit I had not read your story until a friend shared it on FB. I was traveling for work and had a similar experience when an Akita was on the side of 95 right after the White Marsh exit SB. I stopped to divert a possible slaughter. He was very good and stayed there until police arrived. MSP trooper stopped, opened the passenger side door, the Akita got in and sat down in the front seat. I asked what he planned to do, and he said if no one claims him he is mine. If he wasn't going to be the trooper's then he would have been mine too! Anyway, you and others like you are few and far between so THANK YOU and maybe I will see you around town;-)
you are great security officer, god bless you. !
Thank you Officer Dan, for having an open mind and saving a life!
Thank you Officer Dan for both your common sense and for your blessed heart! There should be more officers and people in general with your mentality and compassion! Bo is one lucky boy! ;)
The world needs more heroes like you! I had the police called on me for yelling at 2 kids walking down the street swinging a kitten by it's tail. The officer who responded didn't care at all about the kitten or what the kids had been doing. Thankfully, I didn't get arrested. I just wish that officer had cared enough to do something about animal cruelty. Glad to know they're not all the same! Best wishes to you and your new fur-ever friend =)
This is absolutely INSPIRATIONAL and a TRUE TESTAMENT to what being a police officer is all about. Caring! Bravo Officer Waskiewicz - the world is truly a better place with you in it and for Bo you were/are MOST DEFINATELY his hero! Thank you for taking the time to access the situation, not over-react and most importantly having the compassionate heart you have and giving this wonderful boy a new life and a chance at love forever! INSPIRATIONAL - UPLIFTING - I wish we could clone you!!!! Made me cry (happy tears) and smile from ear to ear! You are also "my hero" for saving this wonderful dog from death!!!!! BRAVO! Hugs to Bo and his other 4-legged family members AND a BIG HUG to you Office Waskiewicz! Thank you will all my heart and soul! Thank you!
Thank you Officer Waskiewicz for saving Bo. The world would be a better place if there were more people like you around. You're a true hero.!!!!!
I am just so proud of u. Thank u so much!!!
what an admirable thing you did, and how fortunate to have a new addition to your family. Good job Officer Waskiewicz!
So glad to see an officer that knows it is not the breed that is the problem. Pitbulls get a bad wrap. It is the humans that make them what they are. In our town cops kill pitbulls for no reason.
Oh yeah, good job Officer Dan.
Well done, Officer Waskiewicz!
Pit Bulls are good dogs its about the inbreeding and abuse by the owners that make them mean. I know the Virginia State Police uses Pit Bulls for detector dogs. What does that tell ya. : )
Hi Lieutenant Dan! Great Job!
Officer Dan, you are my hero! If only every person in law enforcement could follow your example. You've done a world of good for the public image of both Pit Bulls and Police Officers. Not to mention changing the life of one very lucky dog! Kudos to you! Thank you for sharing your story.
I'm glad it all worked out. But you let a strange dog lick your face???? Genius at work!!!
BRAVO. Thank you officer, you're an angel.
I'm not sure if this is allowed, but I live here in Maryland, and this happening in my own community is a heck of an inspiration, especially after the recent ruling from our Court of Appeals that Pits are inherently dangerous. We're fighting that one tooth and nail, but stories like this one do more to show that these are loving animals than a thousand petitions could. Beyond that, this is obviously just a great, loving guy. I'm trying to raise some money to give to him to help out with the expenses involved (adoption fees, vet bills, etc.). If any of you would like to contribute, I'd sure appreciate it. http://www.indiegogo.com/OfficerDan?a=883041
You sir, are an angel!!!
What a great story. Thank you for helping both people and dogs :)
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<p>Photo Credit: Mark Rogers Photography</p> <p><span>MESA, AZ - A pit bull puppy that has been recovering from serious injuries since March is now ready to be taken home by a loving family. </span><span>To be eligible to adopt Miles, interested applicants are encouraged to fill out an Adoption Application at </span><a href="http://www.pawsaz.org/" target="_blank">http://www.pawsaz.org</a><span> . </span></p>
<h3>Miles Story:</h3>
<p>Miles’s story has turned from a heart breaking tragedy into a miracle. Thanks to the incredible outpouring of our community to help this little boy, his story will have a happy ending and he now has the second chance that he so deserves.  We at PAWSaz have been helping animals in similar situations by reaching out to the special needs cases, the medically needy and other animals who just need the same second chance that Miles is getting.  We strive to help many more animals like Miles!</p>
<p>Our goal is to build a much needed permanent animal sanctuary in the East Valley, where we can provide a safe haven for animals at risk of unnecessary euthanasia, provide medical care for animals at risk and improve animal rights by increasing community awareness of animal welfare issues.  As such, we are looking for at least 5 acres on which to build the following:</p>
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<li>A designated area for the permanent residents who will live out their lives at the sanctuary in open housing areas (structure for seniors, structure for those with handicaps, structure for cats, etc).</li>
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<p>Miles’ left arm had multiple fractures – compound, not only were the radius and ulna fractured, but also the elbow was in pieces and sticking out of the skin – and was infected. Luckily, with daily bandage changes, the wound has healed and closed over, but the fracture in the elbow will require specialized surgery with a board certified surgeon and will not heal with a splint alone.  We are hoping to raise the necessary funds for him so we can save this leg (the only other option will be amputation). The surgery to save his leg will cost between $3,000 and $5,000.</p>
<p>All lacerations and punctures have healed. Miles is striving in his foster home, where he lives with two Chihuahuas, a Bichon and several other pit bulls and cats. Miles is now the happiest little camper and will hopefully be available for adoption soon.</p>
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